Fish Management

Fish Management

  • I will work with all stakeholders to strike a balance between competing interests
  • I will support science-based, high sustained yield (harvest) management practices with local area biologists making the day-to-day management decisions
  • I will engage with citizens and stakeholders with the intent of exploring solutions

Having spent 30 years in Prince William Sound, I am familiar with the importance fisheries play in all aspects of the economy. As governor, I will work with stakeholders to strike a balance between competing interests. This is a tough task. My background along with my desire to uphold the state constitution, will allow me to strive to find common ground and a fair, reasonable solution to this issue.

The founders of the Alaska Constitution recognized the importance of the fishing industry along with the management of this resource by including it in the Constitution. In so doing, they mandated that this valuable resource “be utilized, developed and maintained on a sustained yield principle.”

Similar language has been incorporated into Alaska Statutes directing the Commissioner to “manage, protect, maintain, approve and extend the fish, game and aquatic plant resources of the State in the interest of the economy and the general well being of the State. . . . through rehabilitation, enhancement, and development programs and developing management plans as necessary to ensure perpetual and increasing production and use of the food resources of State waters and continental shelf areas.”

As governor, I will support science-based, high sustained yield (harvest) management practices with local area biologists making the day-to-day management decisions. Furthermore, I will protect, maintain and improve the fish, game and aquatic plant resources of the State, and manage their use and development for the well-being of the people of the State, consistent with high-sustained yield principles. I will engage with citizens and stake holders with the intent of exploring solutions to eliminate conflicts and make every effort to understand all views concerning fisheries’ issues prior to any regulatory process.

In Southeast, there is a growing concern about the impact the sea otter population is having on the crab fishery. There are ongoing studies of the problem and it appears to have greatly impacted the crab fishery in that area. While it is unclear at this time what the exact solution is, it is well understood that the sea otter population is growing and measures must be undertaken to address this critical problem.